Clouds hinder solar eclipse viewing in Coon Rapids

  • Print Friendly and PDF
  • Print Friendly and PDF

Boy Scouts in Troop 524 and Cub Scouts in the corresponding pack, which meet at the Church of the Epiphany in Coon Rapids, set out to earn a solar eclipse patch during the rare celestial event Aug. 21.

Cub Scouts from Pack 524 experiment with paper plates and pennies, simulating a solar eclipse. In the activity, plates represent the sun, pennies stand in for the moon and their eyes are the earth. Photos by Olivia Alveshere

Cub Scouts from Pack 524 experiment with paper plates and pennies, simulating a solar eclipse. In the activity, plates represent the sun, pennies stand in for the moon and their eyes are the earth. Photos by Olivia Alveshere

It’s been 38 years since the continental United States saw a total solar eclipse. This time around, Minnesota was north of the path of totality, but the Twin Cities area was expected to see about 85 percent coverage after 1 p.m.

Cloud cover hampered the view, but Scouts made the most of their time together with fun activities.

Scouts created artwork showing exactly what happens during an eclipse, and made pinhole cameras to keep their eyes safe from the sun.

One must not stare directly into the sun during an eclipse, 7-year-old Cub Scout Zach Reiland explained. Special glasses or a pinhole camera must be used “so it doesn’t burn your eyes.”

An experiment with paper plates and pennies simulated what was about to unfold. In the activity, plates represented the sun, pennies stood in for the moon and Scouts’ eyes were the earth. Partners backed up with a paper plate until they were told that the penny obscured it.

“Eclipse Tag” had the moon take out the sun, swiping yellow neckerchiefs, and trivia about the solar eclipse was popular with older boys.

The United States will see another total eclipse in 2024.

[email protected]

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Purchase Photos

menards flyer promo