Years of experience with body cameras a plus, police chief says

Burnsville Police Chief Eric Gieseke, pictured with Capt. Tanya Schwartz, showed the shirt-mounted body camera officers use. (Photo by John Gessner)

Burnsville Police Chief Eric Gieseke, pictured with Capt. Tanya Schwartz, showed the shirt-mounted body camera officers use. (Photo by John Gessner)

After an officer’s fatal shooting of Justine Damond last month, Minneapolis’ acting police chief announced a policy requiring cops to activate their body cameras when responding to calls or initiating their own actions.

The policy follows the shooting of Damond, an unarmed 911 caller, by an officer whose camera wasn’t on. Nor was his partner’s. Minneapolis police have used body cameras for less than a year.

In Burnsville, which pioneered the use of body cameras seven years ago, they’ve become part of police culture, along with expectations for their use.

“Quite frankly, I think we have a culture here now where we know there are officers — because they’ve told us — they don’t want to be the one on a call to have to explain why the camera was not on,” Police Chief Eric Gieseke said in an interview this week. “They don’t want to be that person.”

Continue reading this Sun Thisweek story.

 

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