Rekindling baseball history lost to segregation

Over time, Frank White has been able to identify at least seven players in this photo from the Uptown Sanitary Shop team from 1923. (Submitted photo)

Over time, Frank White has been able to identify at least seven players in this photo from the Uptown Sanitary Shop team from 1923. (Submitted photo)

Growing up, baseball was Frank White’s life.

When the local historian was a kid, he and his friends would play baseball every single day they could manage.

“Sometimes we would take a break to eat,” White said.

If only six kids could make it, they would amend the rules to keep on playing.

“I played because I wanted to be like my dad,” White said.

His father, Louis “Pud” White, played for the Twin Cities Colored Giants during the heyday of Minnesota baseball.

“Pud,” short for Pudding Pie, even won a battling title in 1946 with a .600, a record still held today.

But like many of his African-American colleagues, his name is unknown because of segregation in athletics.

As Frank researched the mostly oral retelling of black baseball, he realized that the dense history of black baseball has been largely forgotten due to the segregation of baseball.

Continue reading this Sun Current story.

 

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