Diversity in government is ‘imperative,’ suburbs making efforts

Part 3: Cities, organizations, citizens participating in change

Brooklyn Park Police Chief Craig Enevoldsen, right, swears in Esther Gomez as a new police officer. Gomez is a graduate of the city’s police cadet program. (Sun Post staff photo by Paul Groessel)

Brooklyn Park Police Chief Craig Enevoldsen, right, swears in Esther Gomez as a new police officer. Gomez is a graduate of the city’s police cadet program. (Sun Post staff photo by Paul Groessel)

Rae Blaylark is a longtime Twin Cities resident who moved to Robbinsdale five years ago and now serves on the Heart of Robbinsdale Community Foundation’s board. She said it is “imperative” for local governments to be representative of their citizenry.

“People’s causes are better heard and responded to when someone who either looks like them or has firsthand experience with their experiences,” she said. “It’s a representation issue. It’s a trust issue.”

Blaylark said it could be “extremely helpful” if there were more minority representation in her city’s government, but stressed that she believes civic leaders like Robbinsdale Mayor Regan Murphy have the best interests of all citizens at heart.

Continue reading this Sun Post story. Catch up on the series: Part 1 and Part 2.

 

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