The once, and future, king of Donkey Kong?

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Steve Wiebe attempts to break the world record score for “Donkey Kong,” a 1980s arcade game, while playing in front of an audience in the Mall of America’s rotunda July 11. Wiebe’s video game skill was the focus of a 2007 documentary about the quest to be the best at the game. His chase of the world record continues to this day, and the film inspired a new generation of players who now compete alongside Wiebe. (Sun Current photo by Adam Warner)

Steve Wiebe attempts to break the world record score for “Donkey Kong,” a 1980s arcade game, while playing in front of an audience in the Mall of America’s rotunda July 11. Wiebe’s video game skill was the focus of a 2007 documentary about the quest to be the best at the game. His chase of the world record continues to this day, and the film inspired a new generation of players who now compete alongside Wiebe. (Sun Current photo by Adam Warner)

The classic tale of a man versus overgrown gorilla captured the video game world’s fascination in the 1980s, and thanks to those who never tired of the arcade classic, a new generation has been inspired to take the game to new heights in the most improbable game of one-upmanship.

The once, and perhaps future, king of the 1980s video game “Donkey Kong” visited Mall of America in Bloomington recently, in conjunction with the mall’s promotion of “Pixels,” a live-action film that imagines a world where aliens bring the characters from classic video games to life as part of an attack upon Earth. The film features Redmond, Wash., resident Steve Wiebe as a scientist. At least Wiebe thinks he’s in the movie. He wasn’t sure if his 10-second role as a lab scientist made the final cut of the film.

Continue reading this Sun Current story.

 

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